Comparison of a Self-Administered and Physician-Administered Expanded Disability Status Scale with Functional System Scores in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

TitleComparison of a Self-Administered and Physician-Administered Expanded Disability Status Scale with Functional System Scores in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
1999
AuthorsBowen JD, Gibbons LE, Gianas A, Kraft GH
JournalMultiple Sclerosis
Volume5
IssueS1
PaginationS74
10597325
*Multiple Sclerosis/therapy, Animals, Humans

Background: A self-administered Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS-S) was developed to measure disability in a large cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Methods: Consecutive outpatients with clinically definite MS completed an EDSS-S and a physician-administered EDSS (EDSS-P) during a single visit. If needed, caregivers or clinic staff could assist in completing the form. The EDSS-P visual acuity was obtained using a Snellen chart at 20 feet; gait was actually observed. The EDSS was calculated two ways, using gait and functional system scores (FSS) combined (using a weighted visions FSS) and using gait alone. Results: EDSS-P scores ranged from 0-9.5 (mean 5.1, median 5.0, N=95, 78% female, age 17-78 mean 45). Mean physician-administered scores, patient-administered scores and intraclass correlation coefficients of agreement were: EDSS using ambulation alone (4.6, 5.3, 0.89), EDSS using ambulation + FSS (4.6, 5.3, 0.87), bowel/bladder FSS (1.6, 1.7, 0.79), cerebellar FS (1.1, 1.6, 0.55), brainstem FS (0.5, 1.2, 0.45), vision FS (1.9, 1.3, 0.38), cerebral FS (0.6, 2.3, 0.27). Conclusion: Good correlations were seen between overall EDSS-S and EDSS-P scores. Patients scored themselves more disabled than physicians on most measures.

http://msj.sagepub.com/content/5/1_suppl/S1.full.pdf+html

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