Satisfaction With Quality of Life in Patients with MS.

TitleSatisfaction With Quality of Life in Patients with MS.
Publication TypeJournal Article
2004
AuthorsAmtmann D, Johnson KL, Kuehn CM, Vollan T
JournalInternational Journal of MS Care
Volume6
Issue2
Pagination79-80

In 2002, we surveyed individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) living in Eastern Washington State (N = 548). In addition to measuring demographic characteristics, disease history, symptoms, health care and health status the survey included three questions intended as broad measures of quality of life. The response format for all three questions utilized a five point Likert-type scale collapsed to three categories for analysis. The data were analyzed using ordered logistic regression. In all analyses we controlled for type of MS, employment status, gender, pain, and heat sensitivity. The 1) their satisfaction with their life, 2) their coping with MS, and 3) their satisfaction with their ability to do the activities that are important to them. As expected, in all three analyses, overall health status was a significant predictor. The better the overall health status the more likely the respondents were to endorse higher levels of satisfaction with life and with the ability to do important activities, as well as coping with MS. Conversely, respondents who reported depression symptoms and higher levels of EDSS were significantly more likely to endorse lower levels of satisfaction with life and the ability to do important activities, as well as coping with MS. Respondents who lived with a spouse or a partner and those who had seen a massage therapist in the last year were significantly more likely to endorse responses that indicated higher quality of life. Duration was a significant predictor of the level of coping and ability to do the activities that are important. However, the association was positive, i.e., respondents with longer duration of MS were more likely to endorse higher satisfaction with coping with MS and with their ability to do important activities. We recommend clinicians inquire about depression, coping, and quality of life issues routinely.

http://www.ijmsc.org/doi/pdf/10.7224/1537-2073-6.2.55

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