A PROMIS fatigue short form for use by individuals who have multiple sclerosis.

TitleA PROMIS fatigue short form for use by individuals who have multiple sclerosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
2012
AuthorsCook KF, Bamer AM, Roddey TS, Kraft GH, Kim J, Amtmann D
JournalQual Life Res
Volume21
Issue6
Pagination1021-30
Date Published2012 Aug
ISSN1573-2649

PURPOSE: To derive from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) fatigue item bank, a short form for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), the PROMIS-Fatigue(MS).

METHODS: A panel of 37 clinicians and 46 individuals with MS ranked the relevance of PROMIS fatigue items to persons with MS. Eight items were selected for the PROMIS-Fatigue(MS) that maximized relevance rankings, content coverage, and item discrimination. The PROMIS-Fatigue(MS) and an existing, 7-item PROMIS fatigue short form (PROMIS-Fatigue(SFv1.0)) were administered to a new sample of 231 individuals with MS. Known groups and content validity were assessed.

RESULTS: Scores from the short forms were highly correlated (r = 0.92). Discriminant validity of the PROMIS-Fatigue(MS) scores was supported in known groups comparisons. Scores of neither short form exhibited an advantage in quantitative analyses. The PROMIS-Fatigue(MS) targeted more of the content included in participants' responses to open-ended questions than did the PROMIS-Fatigue(SFv1.0).

CONCLUSIONS: The PROMIS-Fatigue(MS) was derived to have content validity in MS samples. The validity of the measure was further supported by the ability of PROMIS-Fatigue(MS) items to discriminate among groups expected to differ in levels of fatigue. We recommend its use in measuring the fatigue of individuals with MS.

10.1007/s11136-011-0011-8
Alternate JournalQual Life Res

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